Glycemic Index & Diabetes: Things To Know

Glycemic Index & Diabetes: Things To Know


Hello, I am Ty Mason of thediabetescouncil.com,
researcher, writer and I have type 2 diabetes. Today I want to talk about the glycemic index. After you watch the video today, I invite
you check out the description box for my new ebook. This is one of the most comprehensive diabetes
meal planning book you can find. It contains diabetes friendly meals/recipes,
recipes for different goals such as 800-1800 calories per day meal plan, diabetes meal
planning tips and tricks. There are also tons of diabetes friendly recipes
for everyone! Let me state up front that while I believe
the glycemic index is a very important tool for those of us with diabetes, I truly believe
the glycemic load is a better tool. But the glycemic load uses the glycemic index
in its calculation, therefore understanding the GI is also an important concept. To get the absolute best research material
for this subject, I will be quoting a lot of material from the official website of the
International GI Database which is hosted by the University of Sydney. That web address is www.glycemicindex.com
This website is an extraordinary research tool with a plethora of information about
the glycemic index. I truly invite you to visit this site if you
want to know more about this topic. As I stated, all of my research was done on
this extensive website. The glycemic index (GI) is a ranking of carbs
on a scale from 0 to 100 according to the extent to which they raise blood sugar levels
after eating. The ranking is as follows:
Food with a GI of 55 or less is considered a low GI food
Food with a GI of 56-69 is a medium GI food Food with a GO of 70 or higher is a High GI
Food Foods with a high GI are those which are rapidly
digested and absorbed. This results in a yo-yo effect in blood sugar
levels. Low-GI foods are digested and absorbed in
a gradual way. This produces a much more even rise in blood
sugar and insulin levels. Research has proven this much more beneficial
to the health of those with diabetes. Low GI diets have been shown to improve both
glucose and lipid levels in people with diabetes (type 1 and type 2). Weight can be controlled much better with
a low GI diet. Low GI foods are absorbed slowly which helps
you feel fuller longer. The impact on your blood sugar is minimal
and you will see a reduction in insulin levels and insulin resistance. Recent studies from Harvard School of Public
Health indicate that the risks of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease are strongly related
to the GI of the overall diet. In 1999, the World Health Organisation (WHO)
and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) recommended that “people in industrialized
countries base their diets on low-GI foods in order to prevent the most common diseases
of affluence, such as coronary heart disease, diabetes and obesity.” I found it very interesting how a GI value
for a particular food is determined. According to the GI website, “To determine
a food’s GI value, measured portions of the food containing 50 grams of available carbohydrate
(or 25 grams of available carbohydrate for foods that contain lower amounts of carbohydrate)
are fed to 10 healthy people after an overnight fast. Finger-prick blood samples are taken at 15-30
minute intervals over the next two hours. These blood samples are used to construct
a blood sugar response curve for the two hour period. The incremental area under the curve (iAUC)
is calculated to reflect the total rise in blood glucose levels after eating the test
food. The GI value is calculated by dividing the
iAUC for the test food by the iAUC for the reference food (same amount of glucose) and
multiplying by 100.” There is now a push by some to have terms
like “sugars” and “complex carbs” removed from a nutrition label and replaced
with “Total Carbs” (carbs minus dietary fiber) and “Glycemic Index.” The main problem with this concept is that
are very places who conduct legitimate GI calculations. The Human Nutrition Unit at the University
of Sydney has been at the forefront of glycemic index research for over two decades and has
tested hundreds of foods as an integral part of its program. If you have watched any of my videos at all,
you know that I am an advocate of the Glycemic Load rather than the Glycemic Index. The glycemic index basically only tells us
how quickly a food is digested and gets into the bloodstream. But the glycemic load takes into consideration
every component of the food as a whole. It tells us much more about how a food will
affect our blood sugar overall. With Glycemic Load the numbers are different. Foods with a GL 10 and below are considered
low GL Foods with a GL between 11-19 are considered
medium GL Foods with a GL 20 and above are high GL Foods. Because the glycemic load of a food looks
at the food as a whole and not just the carbs, the same food can have a high glycemic index,
but an overall low glycemic load, making it better for you than it originally might have
appeared. Take watermelon for example. If you just looked at the GI of watermelon
(and many have) you would not eat it as one with diabetes. Why? The GI of watermelon is 95. So you are told as one with diabetes you can’t
eat that! It’s GI is way too high. But the GL of watermelon is 4. It has very little impact on blood sugar. So you might have not even considered watermelon
on the basis of the GI, but the GL is so low it’s a great summer time snack. I was so pleased to see the following on the
GI website: “Glycemic load or GL combines both the quality
and quantity of carbohydrate in one ‘number’. It’s the best way to predict blood glucose
values of different types and amounts of food.” This validates my hypothesis about the GL. The formula to calculate GL is very simple:
GL=(GI x the amount of carbs) divided by 100
Note: The amount of carbs is the Total Carbs minus the Dietary Fiber. And this is specific to an amount of food. Let’s take for a calculation as an example:
The GI of Wonder Bread is 70. One slice of Wonder Bread has 15 carbs with
1 carb of dietary fiber. So our formula would be:
70 times 14 (15 carbs minus 1 dietary fiber) divided by 100. This equals 9.8
Wonder Bread has very little impact on your blood sugar. I hope this has shed light on the Glycemic
Index and possibly a little more about the Glycemic Load as well. Don’t forget to get my new ebook and please,
subscribe to our channel for many more videos like this one in the future. Thanks for watching. I am Ty Mason.

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